HEARING AIDS

HEARING AIDS

What is a hearing aid?

Hearing aids are small electronic devices that can be highly customized to address different types of hearing loss. Today, all hearing aids are digital and contain at least one microphone to pick up sound, a computer chip that amplifies and processes sound, a speaker that sends the signal to your ear and a battery for power. Technology advances also provide additional features, such as direct connection to a smartphone or rechargeable batteries.
For the millions of Americans who have hearing loss, hearing aids are usually the best option to help correct untreated hearing loss and resume a high quality of life. Many types and styles are available to suit every preference and lifestyle.

How do hearing aids help with hearing loss?

A hearing aid amplifies the sounds going into the ear, and is adjusted based on the amount of hearing loss the user has been diagnosed with. Quite often the typical user will have a type of hearing loss known as “sensorineural,” meaning that some of the tiny hair cells of the inner ear are damaged. However, hearing aids can help most types of hearing loss. The surviving healthy hair cells pick up the sound delivered by the hearing aid and send them as neural signals to the brain via the auditory nerve.

What is a hearing aid?

Hearing aids are small electronic devices that can be highly customized to address different types of hearing loss. Today, all hearing aids are digital and contain at least one microphone to pick up sound, a computer chip that amplifies and processes sound, a speaker that sends the signal to your ear and a battery for power. Technology advances also provide additional features, such as direct connection to a smartphone or rechargeable batteries.
For the millions of Americans who have hearing loss, hearing aids are usually the best option to help correct untreated hearing loss and resume a high quality of life. Many types and styles are available to suit every preference and lifestyle.

How do hearing aids help with hearing loss?

A hearing aid amplifies the sounds going into the ear, and is adjusted based on the amount of hearing loss the user has been diagnosed with. Quite often the typical user will have a type of hearing loss known as “sensorineural,” meaning that some of the tiny hair cells of the inner ear are damaged. However, hearing aids can help most types of hearing loss. The surviving healthy hair cells pick up the sound delivered by the hearing aid and send them as neural signals to the brain via the auditory nerve.

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Types of Hearing Aids

Hearing Aid Fitting

Hearing Aid Repair

Recommended Brands

Our Products

Which Type Of Hearing Aid
Is Right For You?

The following are common hearing aid styles, beginning with the smallest, least visible in the ear. Hearing aid designers keep making smaller hearing aids to meet the demand for a hearing aid that is not very noticeable. But the smaller aids may not have the power to give you the improved hearing you may expect. By far, the most popular style of hearing aids today are Receiver-in-Canal (RIC), due to their range of fitting, size, comfort, and sound quality.

hearingaids-cic

CIC HEARING AIDS

A completely-in-the-canal hearing aid is molded to fit inside your ear canal. There are limits to a CIC hearing aid, because due to the size many of today’s noise reduction features and wireless connectivity is lost.
A CIC hearing aid:
The smallest type
Less likely to pick up wind noise
Uses very small batteries, which have a shorter life and can be difficult to handle
Doesn’t contain extra features, such as volume control or a directional microphone
Is susceptible to earwax clogging the speaker
hearingaids-hs-itc

ITC HEARING AIDS

An in-the-canal (ITC) hearing aid is custom molded and fits partly in the ear canal. This style can improve mild to moderate hearing loss in adults.
An ITC hearing aid:
Is less visible in the ear than larger styles
Includes features that won’t fit on CIC aids, but may be difficult to adjust due to its small size
Is susceptible to earwax clogging the speaker
hearingaids-ite

ITE HEARING AIDS

An in-the-ear (ITE) hearing aid is custom made to fill most of the bowl-shaped area of your outer ear (full shell) and can fit people with mild to severe hearing loss.
An ITE hearing aid:
Includes features that don’t fit on smaller style hearing aids, such as a volume control
May be easier to handle
Uses a larger battery for longer battery life
Is susceptible to earwax clogging the speaker
Is more visible in the ear than smaller devices
hearingaids-bte

BTE HEARING AIDS

A behind-the-ear (BTE) hearing aid hooks over the top of your ear and rests behind the ear. A thicker tube connects the hearing aid to an earmold that fits in your ear canal. This type is appropriate for people of all ages and those with almost any type of hearing loss. This is very common with pediatric patients or those with a more profound hearing loss.
A BTE hearing aid:
Traditionally has been the largest type of hearing aid, though some newer mini designs are streamlined
Is capable of more amplification than are other styles
hearingaids-open fit

OPEN FIT HEARING AIDS

An open-fit hearing aid is a variation of the behind-the-ear hearing aid with a thin tube. This style is very similar to RIC hearing aids. This style keeps the ear canal very open, allowing for low-frequency sounds to enter the ear naturally and for high-frequency sounds to be amplified through the hearing aid. This makes the style a good choice for people with mild to moderate hearing loss.
An open-fit hearing aid:
Is less visible
Doesn’t plug the ear like the small in-the-canal hearing aids do, making your own voice sound better to you
May be more difficult to handle and adjust due to small parts
hearingaids-ric

RIC HEARING AIDS

The receiver-in-canal (RIC) is similar to a behind-the-ear hearing aid with the speaker or receiver in the canal or in the ear. This style keeps the ear canal open, allowing for low-frequency sounds to enter the ear naturally and for high-frequency sounds to be amplified through the hearing aid. A tiny wire, rather than tubing, connects the pieces. This type accounts for 75% of new fittings today.
An RIC hearing aid:
Has a less visible behind-the-ear portion
Lightweight and comfortable
Is susceptible to earwax clogging the speaker

SPECIAL HEARING AID FEATURES

Many of our devices come with special programming features, including noise management programs, automatic adjustments, ear to ear communication, function controls, directional microphones, wireless Bluetooth controls, music programs and telecoil. These features make it easier to communicate. The telecoil feature is also useful in public facilities with induction loop systems. Consult with our hearing professionals to determine which features are best for you!

Which Type Of Hearing Aid Is Right For You?

The following are common hearing aid styles, beginning with the smallest, least visible in the ear. Hearing aid designers keep making smaller hearing aids to meet the demand for a hearing aid that is not very noticeable. But the smaller aids may not have the power to give you the improved hearing you may expect. By far, the most popular style of hearing aids today are Receiver-in-Canal (RIC), due to their range of fitting, size, comfort, and sound quality.
hearingaids-cic

CIC HEARING AIDS

A completely-in-the-canal hearing aid is molded to fit inside your ear canal. There are limits to a CIC hearing aid, because due to the size many of today’s noise reduction features and wireless connectivity is lost.
A CIC hearing aid:
The smallest type
Less likely to pick up wind noise
Uses very small batteries, which have a shorter life and can be difficult to handle
Doesn’t contain extra features, such as volume control or a directional microphone
Is susceptible to earwax clogging the speaker
hearingaids-hs-itc

ITC HEARING AIDS

An in-the-canal (ITC) hearing aid is custom molded and fits partly in the ear canal. This style can improve mild to moderate hearing loss in adults.
An ITC hearing aid:
Is less visible in the ear than larger styles
Includes features that won’t fit on CIC aids, but may be difficult to adjust due to its small size
Is susceptible to earwax clogging the speaker
hearingaids-ite

ITE HEARING AIDS

An in-the-ear (ITE) hearing aid is custom made to fill most of the bowl-shaped area of your outer ear (full shell) and can fit people with mild to severe hearing loss.
An ITE hearing aid:
Includes features that don’t fit on smaller style hearing aids, such as a volume control
May be easier to handle
Uses a larger battery for longer battery life
Is susceptible to earwax clogging the speaker
Is more visible in the ear than smaller devices
hearingaids-bte

BTE HEARING AIDS

A behind-the-ear (BTE) hearing aid hooks over the top of your ear and rests behind the ear. A thicker tube connects the hearing aid to an earmold that fits in your ear canal. This type is appropriate for people of all ages and those with almost any type of hearing loss. This is very common with pediatric patients or those with a more profound hearing loss.
A BTE hearing aid:
Traditionally has been the largest type of hearing aid, though some newer mini designs are streamlined
Is capable of more amplification than are other styles
hearingaids-ric

RIC HEARING AIDS

The receiver-in-canal (RIC) is similar to a behind-the-ear hearing aid with the speaker or receiver in the canal or in the ear. This style keeps the ear canal open, allowing for low-frequency sounds to enter the ear naturally and for high-frequency sounds to be amplified through the hearing aid. A tiny wire, rather than tubing, connects the pieces. This type accounts for 75% of new fittings today.
An RIC hearing aid:
Has a less visible behind-the-ear portion
Lightweight and comfortable
Is susceptible to earwax clogging the speaker
hearingaids-open fit

OPEN FIT HEARING AIDS

An open-fit hearing aid is a variation of the behind-the-ear hearing aid with a thin tube. This style is very similar to RIC hearing aids. This style keeps the ear canal very open, allowing for low-frequency sounds to enter the ear naturally and for high-frequency sounds to be amplified through the hearing aid. This makes the style a good choice for people with mild to moderate hearing loss.
An open-fit hearing aid:
Is less visible
Doesn’t plug the ear like the small in-the-canal hearing aids do, making your own voice sound better to you
May be more difficult to handle and adjust due to small parts

SPECIAL HEARING AID FEATURES

Many of our devices come with special programming features, including noise management programs, automatic adjustments, ear to ear communication, function controls, directional microphones, wireless Bluetooth controls, music programs and telecoil. These features make it easier to communicate. The telecoil feature is also useful in public facilities with induction loop systems. Consult with our hearing professionals to determine which features are best for you!

Hearing Aid Fitting

Hearing Aid Fitting

Like wearing comfortable shoes, the right fit makes all the difference. Hearing aid fitting is a critical part of your success with hearing aids. Hearing aids work extremely well when custom-fitted to your ears and adjusted for your hearing needs and preferences. That’s why it’s important to come to us for professional services.
First, our hearing professionals will check that your hearing aids feel comfortable. Then, we’ll program them to check your hearing with the hearing aids in place. After that, we’ll show you the advanced features of your new hearing aids and how to care for them.
Though there’s no perfect way to learn how to adjust to hearing aids, the time you spend adjusting to your new hearing aids is worthwhile. Try to be patient with yourself as you get used to the new sounds, and return to our office for adjustments or consultation if needed.
We’ll program your new hearing aids based on the results of your hearing test and your individual preferences and unique listening environments. We can fine-tune your hearing instruments to help you hear in a variety of situations, including in restaurants, crowds and other difficult listening situations. Hearing is subjective; friends with the same hearing loss as you may prefer to have their hearing aids programmed differently.
Like wearing comfortable shoes, the right fit makes all the difference. Hearing aid fitting is a critical part of your success with hearing aids. Hearing aids work extremely well when custom-fitted to your ears and adjusted for your hearing needs and preferences. That’s why it’s important to come to us for professional services.
First, our hearing professionals will check that your hearing aids feel comfortable. Then, we’ll program them to check your hearing with the hearing aids in place. After that, we’ll show you the advanced features of your new hearing aids and how to care for them.
Though there’s no perfect way to learn how to adjust to hearing aids, the time you spend adjusting to your new hearing aids is worthwhile. Try to be patient with yourself as you get used to the new sounds, and return to our office for adjustments or consultation if needed.
We’ll program your new hearing aids based on the results of your hearing test and your individual preferences and unique listening environments. We can fine-tune your hearing instruments to help you hear in a variety of situations, including in restaurants, crowds and other difficult listening situations. Hearing is subjective; friends with the same hearing loss as you may prefer to have their hearing aids programmed differently.

Hearing Aid Repair

Hearing Aid Repair

Are you having issues with your hearing aids?

Even with the most meticulous care of hearing aids, repairs can happen. We recommend all of our patients use a Dry & Store or Dry Caddy to help with moisture-related repairs. Hearing aids can be dropped off for cleaning, tube change, or wax guard change anytime. We do provide all of our patients a lifetime of in-office maintenance and cleanings for the life of their hearing aids. Most new hearing aids come with a 2-3 year manufacturer’s warranty, in case of the hearing aid having to be sent to the manufacturer for repair.

If you are new to our area, we can service and repair most makes and models of hearing aids.

We’re here to help you hear better and enjoy life more! CALL TODAY.
(423) 928-5771

DO YOU NEED A LOANER
DURING REPAIR?

While your hearing aid is being repaired, our loaner service can provide you with a temporary hearing aid. These instruments won’t fit or sound exactly like your own aids. But in a pinch, it’s good to have something that will get you through the days until your aid comes back.

Assistive Hearing Devices

Individuals with a hearing loss sometimes have more difficulty hearing things that are a part of regular daily life, like telephones ringing or alarm clocks buzzing. Assistive Listening Devices are designed to help those with impaired hearing receive alerts or hear better by amplifying the sounds they create. They can include amplified phones, amplified alarm clock with bed shakers, fire alarms, PSAPS, and TV loop induction systems. We have a variety of products that we can recommend for your personal situation. Many of these devices work with and without the use of a hearing aid.

CaptionCall

CaptionCall is a free assistive technology service that helps with landline phone conversations by clearly displaying the spoken words of the individual you’re talking to — instantly. Not only does CaptionCall allow you to catch every word of your conversation, but it provides a clear advantage to those who prefer to use landlines while wearing hearing aids.

It’s easy to use: A friend or family member calls your CaptionCall phone through your landline phone number, and you speak to one another normally. If you need captions, press the “captions on” button on the phone, and the caller’s voice will connect to the CaptionCall service, where a communications assistant converts the caller’s words to text using a voice-recognition technology. The words then display over the seven-inch screen for you to read while you’re talking — just in case you miss a word or two.

The CaptionCall services and phone are free if a qualified hearing care professional signs a certification form that details your hearing loss and your need for a captioned telephone service. High-speed internet and a landline telephone are both required to use the service.

HEARING AID BATTERIES 101

• Hearing aid batteries are standardized with number and color codes to make it easy to find what you need. The easy-to-remember codes are 675 (Blue), 13 (Orange), 312 (Brown) and 10 (Yellow).
• Hearing aid batteries typically last about 7-10 days, depending on the size of the battery, your model hearing aid, level of hearing loss and the demands of the location where you use them. The more active your hearing aid is, the more battery power it will use.
• Keep at least a month’s supply of hearing aid batteries on hand, about eight to 10, and order more once you’re down to four to allow for shipping time.

Accessories and Maintenance

There are many accessories the you may need in order to get the most out of your new hearing aids and certainly some upkeep and maintenance involved. Our Audiologists are ready to help you with your hearing aids and will make sure you know exactly what you need to do to have the best hearing possible.

Visit Dr. Schumaier and Associates To Get Your 1 Year Supply Of Batteries When You Buy A New Hearing Aid.

CALL TODAY.

Are you having issues with your hearing aids?

Even with the most meticulous care of hearing aids, repairs can happen. We recommend all of our patients use a Dry & Store or Dry Caddy to help with moisture-related repairs. Hearing aids can be dropped off for cleaning, tube change, or wax guard change anytime. We do provide all of our patients a lifetime of in-office maintenance and cleanings for the life of their hearing aids. Most new hearing aids come with a 2-3 year manufacturer’s warranty, in case of the hearing aid having to be sent to the manufacturer for repair.
If you are new to our area, we can service and repair most makes and models of hearing aids.

We’re here to help you hear better and enjoy life more! CALL TODAY.

DO YOU NEED A LOANER
DURING REPAIR?

While your hearing aid is being repaired, our loaner service can provide you with a temporary hearing aid. We have a wide range of in-the-ear and canal aids, as well as powerful behind-the-ear devices. These instruments won’t fit or sound exactly like your own aids. But in a pinch, it’s good to have something that will get you through the days until your aid comes back.

Assistive Hearing Devices

Individuals with a hearing loss sometimes have more difficulty hearing things that are a part of regular daily life, like telephones ringing or alarm clocks buzzing. Assistive Listening Devices are designed to help those with impaired hearing receive alerts or hear better by amplifying the sounds they create. They can include amplified phones, amplified alarm clock with bed shakers, fire alarms, PSAPS, and TV loop induction systems. We have a variety of products that we can recommend for your personal situation. Many of these devices work with and without the use of a hearing aid.

CaptionCall

CaptionCall is a free assistive technology service that helps with landline phone conversations by clearly displaying the spoken words of the individual you’re talking to — instantly. Not only does CaptionCall allow you to catch every word of your conversation, but it provides a clear advantage to those who prefer to use landlines while wearing hearing aids.
It’s easy to use: A friend or family member calls your CaptionCall phone through your landline phone number, and you speak to one another normally. If you need captions, press the “captions on” button on the phone, and the caller’s voice will connect to the CaptionCall service, where a communications assistant converts the caller’s words to text using a voice-recognition technology. The words then display over the seven-inch screen for you to read while you’re talking — just in case you miss a word or two.
The CaptionCall services and phone are free if a qualified hearing care professional signs a certification form that details your hearing loss and your need for a captioned telephone service. High-speed internet and a landline telephone are both required to use the service.

HEARING AID BATTERIES 101

• Hearing aid batteries are standardized with number and color codes to make it easy to find what you need. The easy-to-remember codes are 675 (Blue), 13 (Orange), 312 (Brown) and 10 (Yellow).
• Hearing aid batteries typically last about 7-10 days, depending on the size of the battery, your model hearing aid, level of hearing loss and the demands of the location where you use them. The more active your hearing aid is, the more battery power it will use.
• Keep at least a month’s supply of hearing aid batteries on hand, about eight to 10, and order more once you’re down to four to allow for shipping time.

Accessories and Maintenance

There are many accessories the you may need in order to get the most out of your new hearing aids and certainly some upkeep and maintenance involved. Our Audiologists are ready to help you with your hearing aids and will make sure you know exactly what you need to do to have the best hearing possible.
Visit Dr. Schumaier and Associates To Get Your 1 Year Supply Of Batteries When You Buy A New Hearing Aid.

CALL TODAY.

Brands We Recommend

Brands We Recommend

Your hearing is specific to you. At Dr. Schumaier and Associates, we feature many of the top brands and products to fit your specific needs.

Call us today to set up an initial consultation. Just as your hearing is specific to you we want to ensure you get the right product to meet your needs.

Other Features and Accessories

Many hearing aids we offer come with optional features like directional microphones, listening programs and Bluetooth® compatibility as well as accessories to help with TV watching and hands-free cell phone connection. Assistive listening devices are available when hearing aids are not enough or not an option.
Your hearing is specific to you. At Dr. Schumaier and Associates, we feature many of the top brands and products to fit your specific needs.
Call us today to set up an initial consultation. Just as your hearing is specific to you we want to ensure you get the right product to meet your needs.

Other Features and Accessories

Many hearing aids we offer come with optional features like directional microphones, listening programs and Bluetooth® compatibility as well as accessories to help with TV watching and hands-free cell phone connection. Assistive listening devices are available when hearing aids are not enough or not an option.

Don’t Wait! Early Treatment Is
The Most Effective Treatment.

Don’t Wait! Early Treatment Is The Most Effective Treatment.

Johnson City

106 E Watauga Ave
Johnson City, TN 37601

(423) 928-5771

DIRECTIONS

Greeneville

400 Y Street
Greeneville, TN 37745

(423) 638-2721

DIRECTIONS

Johnson City
106 E Watauga Ave
Johnson City, TN 37601

(423) 928-5771

DIRECTIONS

Greeneville
400 Y Street
Greeneville, TN 37745

(423) 638-2721

DIRECTIONS